Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 1 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 2 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 3 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 4 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 5 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 6 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 7 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 8 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 9 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 10 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 11 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 12 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 13 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 14 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 15 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 16 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 17 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 18 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 19 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 20 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 21 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 22 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 23 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 24 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 25 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 26 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 27 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 28 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 29 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 30 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 31 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 32 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 33 of 34Tibetan Terrier

  • Photo 34 of 34Tibetan Terrier

Tibetan Terrier Picture Gallery

Tibetan Terrier Breeders

Tibetan Terrier Clubs/Associations

The Full Tibetan Terrier Description

The Tibetan Terrier has always been a companion dog. That's probably why to this day the Tibetan Terrier enjoys people so much. He is a happy, outgoing dog. They are extremely agile. They can use their paws like cats to wash, catch, hold and even bat at tennis balls. They are usually quiet and when they do bark, it starts out low and rises to a high pitch.

Did you know?

Tibetan Terriers originated in the Lost Valley of Tibet.
The breed was thought to bring good luck to anyone who owned one.
The Lost Valley was so inaccessible that visitors were often given a dog to safeguard them on their journey. These dogs were never sold, as the families did not want to tempt fate by selling their "luck."

So you want to own a Tibetan Terrier?

The coat requires regular grooming in order to keep it free from matting.
The Tibetan Terrier is a highly intelligent and sensitive dog. He is devoted and loyal to his family, but may be cautious and shy of strangers.

Indicative Breed Standard

 

General Appearance

Sturdy, medium-sized, long-haired, generally square outline. Balanced, without exaggeration.

Characteristic

Lively, good-natured. Loyal companion dog with many engaging ways.

Temperament

Outgoing, alert, intelligent and game; neither fierce nor pugnacious. Sparing of affection to strangers.

Head and Skull

Skull of medium length, neither broad nor coarse, narrowing slightly from ear to eye, neither domed nor absolutely flat between ears. Zygomatic arch curved, but not overdeveloped so as to bulge. Marked stop in front of eyes but not exaggerated. Muzzle strong; well developed lower jaw. Length from eye to tip of nose equal to length from eye to occiput. Nose black. Head well furnished with long hair, falling forward over eyes. Lower jaw carrying small, but not exaggerated amount of beard. In all giving a resolute expression.

Eyes

Large, round, dark brown, neither prominent nor sunken; set fairly wide apart. Eye rims black.

Ears

Pendant, carried not too close to head, V-shaped, not too large, set fairly high on the side of the skull, heavily feathered.

Mouth

Scissor or reverse scissor bite. Incisors set in slight curve, evenly spaced and set perpendicular to jaw. Full dentition desirable.

Neck

Strong, muscular, medium length, allowing head to be carried above level of back and giving overall balanced appearance. Flowing into well placed shoulders.

Forequarters

Heavily furnished. Shoulders well laid; with good length and slope of upper arm. Legs straight and parallel; pasterns slightly sloping.

Body

Well muscled, compact and powerful. Length from point of shoulder to root of tail equal to height at withers. Fair spring of rib with depth of brisket to elbow. Ribbed well back. Top line level, loin short, slightly arched; croup level.

Hindquarters

Heavily furnished, well muscled. Well bent stifles and low set hocks giving level topline and drive.

Feet

Large, round, heavily furnished with hair between toes and pads. Standing well down on pads; no arch in feet.

Tail

Medium length, set on fairly high and carried in a gay curl over back. Very well feathered. Kink near tip often occurring and permissible.

Gait/Movement

Smooth; effortless stride with good reach; powerful drive. When walking or trotting hindlegs should track neither inside nor outside the front legs.

Coat

Double coat. Undercoat fine and woolly. Top coat profuse, fine but neither silky nor woolly; long; either straight or waved but not curly.

Colour

White, golden, cream, grey or smoke, black, parti-colour and tricolours; in fact any colour except chocolate or liver permissible.

Size

Height at shoulder: dogs: 36-41 cms (14-16 ins); bitches: slightly smaller.

About Our Article Directory

Antoinette and Peter Banks (and our pack)
Here you can find information regarding all aspects of dogs. If you have questions regarding breeding, dog rescue, how to properly train your new pet, and several other questions you will find this section extremely helpful. The Articles contain...

Canis lupus familiaris

This articles is derived from Wikipedia: The dog (Canis lupus familiaris[1]) is a domesticated form of the wolf, a member of the Canidae family of the order Carnivora. The term is used for both feral and pet varieties. The domestic dog has been ...

Hypoallergenic Dogs

By Jeff Cuckson