Shockingly Common Dog Dangers In Your Own Backyard

  • 02/07/2019
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While most dog owners are more concerned about the dangers lurking when they take their dogs for a walk, we seem to forget that our own backyard may be quite dangerous for our four-legged friends. We tend to feel safe once we get back home, take off the leash and let our dog out in the backyard. Sometimes we even forget about the dog spending hours outside, believing it’s a perfectly safe environment. However, is that really the case?

Gaps in the fence

One of the things that provide assurance your dog is not in any kind of danger from outside of your home is the fence. While it’s difficult to argue against this belief, we have to admit that even the best fence might have a gap that we haven’t noticed and which poses a great threat to our dog. That’s why you need to inspect your fence regularly and immediately fix any problems you encounter. Most dogs are quite curious and only too happy to explore the world around them, and they will use any opportunity to get out on the street. Some breeds are known for loving digging and can easily dig a hole under the fence, which is why it’s recommended you dig at least six inches below the fencing and install a wire mesh to prevent tunnelling. When it comes to gates, a padlock is always a better option than a latch, since no dog can unlock it.

Enemies

A lot depends on what kind of dog you have when we talk about predators, for example. A small dog living in a rural area can become an easy target for some birds of prey, let alone wolves and other more dangerous animals. Still, all dogs are susceptible to ticks and fleas, which thrive in an uncultivated environment. Each dog owner should regularly mow the lawn in front of the house, as well as in the backyard. Invest in a reliable lawn mower, such as any model manufactured by Briggs and Stratton, and minimize the risk of ticks ending up on your dog or foxtail barley burrowing into its skin, ears or nose.

Climate

Dogs too can suffer heat stroke, in case you didn’t know. Some breeds are especially vulnerable to heat stroke, so you need to be aware of your dog’s heat tolerance and make sure there is a nice, shady area in your backyard, where it can seek refuge during those hot summer days. Also, your dog should always have access to fresh water. This area can be under a tree or a covered porch, or you can build or buy a big enough doghouse. Similarly, some breeds just can’t tolerate very low temperatures, so make sure your dog has a place to keep warm enough when spending time outside. Put a blanket or a dog bed into the doghouse and your pet will surely appreciate the gesture.

Toxins

A surprisingly high number of accidents that occur in the backyard are related to toxins. That’s why each dog training course insists on the “leave it” cue. You need to prevent your dog from getting into trouble with plants or other animals that might create toxins. Spiders, insects and toads are known to do that and so are fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides and pool cleaners. They all have the potential to poison your dog. If you are not certain whether a particular plant, for example, is dangerous to your dog, do a simple search on the Internet and find out. If the answer is positive, get rid of it as soon as possible.

Fence around swimming pools

If you’re blessed to have a swimming pool in your backyard, you should know that it might pose a threat to your dog. Even though most dogs are good swimmers and enjoy taking a plunge into a pool, they should never do it unattended. Having a fence around the pool when you’re not using it is a sound idea, but you should also teach your dog how to safely get in and out of the pool from an early age in order to minimize the risk of drowning.

As you can see, it’s pretty much all about prevention and being proactive when it comes to safe-proofing your backyard, so that your dog can enjoy it all year round. Since most dogs love spending time outdoors, it’s your task to create as safe an environment as possible for them to spend many happy days in your backyard.

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